August 11, 2014 - Vesicular Stomatitis Confirmed in Texas and Colorado

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Photo from TheHorse.com - The clinical signs of VS include vesicles, erosions, and sloughing of the skin on the muzzle, tongue, teats, and above the hooves. (Photo: Brian McCluckey)

 
Monday, August 11, 2014, 1:41:18 PM - Twelve new cases of vesicular stomatitis have been confirmed in both horses and cows in Bastrop County, Texas, the Texas Animal Health Commission confirmed Wednesday. The newly identified infected animals are currently under quarantine.

In Colorado, a Boulder County premises is also under quarantine after
equine vesicular stomatitis (VS) was confirmed there, and a number of other premises in the surrounding area are being investigated. Four horses on two Weld County premises are also under quarantine after test positive for VS.
 
Horses, mules, cattle, bison, sheep, goats, pigs, llamas and camels are all susceptible to VS. The clinical signs of the disease include vesicles (blisters), erosions, and sloughing of the skin on the muzzle, tongue, teats, and above the hooves of affected livestock. Horses with the condition show blanched raised or broken vesicles around the upper surface of the tongue, surface of the lips and around nostrils, corners of the mouth and the gums. The oral blisters and sores can be painful causing difficulty in eating and drinking. Vesicles are usually only seen early in the course of the disease.
 
The transmission of VS is not completely understood but components include insect vectors, mechanical transmission, and livestock movement.

Photo from Horsetalk.co.nz - The tongue of a horse with vesicular stomatitis (VS).

Don’t overlook the importance of good nutrition as a resource to ward off exposure to VE. It is a known fact that poor nutrition, especially trace mineral deficiency or imbalance, lowers the immune response leading to increased susceptibility to any disease. In today’s world most of our livestock feed is contaminated with glyphosate (Monsanto’s Round Up). In addition to lowering trace minerals in the feed glyphosate is toxic to intestinal bacteria. Click Here for more information about Glyphosate toxicity.

While rare, human cases of VS can occur, usually among those who handle infected animals. In humans the disease can cause flu-like symptoms and only rarely includes lesions or blisters.

Livestock with clinical signs of the disease should be isolated until they are healed and determined to be of no further threat for disease spread which usually takes 2 to 3 weeks. There are no federally approved vaccines for the disease.


If you
suspect VS in your livestock, please contact your local veterinarian.

Learn more in the articles below, or at this links:

The Horse

Horse Talk

Statesman



Vesicular Stomatitis Confirmed in Boulder County, Colorado

From TheHorse.com, By Edited Press Release Jul 21, 2014

A Boulder County premises is under quarantine after equine vesicular stomatitis (VS) was confirmed there, and a number of other premises in the surrounding area are being investigated.

Last week, four horses on two Weld County premises were placed under quarantine after testing positive for VS. Colorado is the second state in the country to have VS; previous positive cases in 2014 have been diagnosed in Texas.

"Strict fly control is an important factor to inhibit the transmission of vesicular stomatis," said Colorado State Veterinarian Keith Roehr, DVM. "One of the most important disease prevention practices … is insect control for both the premises and the individual animals."

Equids, mules, cattle, bison, sheep, goats, pigs, and camelids are all susceptible to VS. The clinical signs of the disease include vesicles, erosions, and sloughing of the skin on the muzzle, tongue, teats, and above the hooves of affected livestock. Vesicles are usually only seen early in the course of the disease. The transmission of VS is not completely understood but components include insect vectors, mechanical transmission, and livestock movement.

While rare, human cases of VS can occur, usually among those who handle infected animals. In humans, the disease can cause flu-like symptoms and only rarely includes lesions or blisters.

Veterinarians and livestock owners who suspect an animal could have VS or any other vesicular disease should immediately contact state or federal animal health authorities.

Livestock with clinical signs of VS are isolated until they are healed and determined to be of no further threat for disease spread. There are no USDA approved vaccines for VS.
 

 

Surge in cases of vesicular stomatitis in Colorado horses

Posted By Horsetalk.co.nz on Jul 31, 2014 in Just Briefly
Twenty-one properties in Colorado are now under quarantine after horses tested positive for vesicular stomatis.

The quarantines are in Boulder, Broomfield, El Paso, Larimer, and Weld counties.

Results on additional tests in other counties are pending, the Colorado Department of Agriculture’s State Veterinarian’s Office reported.

The number of horses affected was not disclosed, but should be provided in the latest weekly situation report, due from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, a division of the US Department of Agriculture in the next day or so.

Colorado is the second state in the country to have confirmed cases of the disease. Previous positive cases of vesicular stomatitis in 2014 have been diagnosed in Texas.

"Vesicular stomatitis can be painful for animals and costly to their owners," state veterinarian Dr Keith Roehr said.

"The virus typically causes oral blisters and sores that can be painful causing difficulty in eating and drinking."

Veterinarians and livestock owners who suspect an animal may have the disease should contact state or federal animal health authorities.

Livestock with clinical signs of the disease are isolated until they are healed and determined to be of no further threat for disease spread. There are no federally approved vaccines for the disease.

While rare, human cases of vesicular stomatitis can occur, usually among those who handle infected animals. VS in humans can cause flu-like symptoms and only rarely includes lesions or blisters.

Susceptible species include horses, mules, cattle, bison, sheep, goats, pigs, and camelids.

Clinical signs include vesicles, erosions and sloughing of the skin on the muzzle, tongue, teats and above the hooves of susceptible livestock. Vesicles are usually only seen early in the course of the disease.

The transmission of vesicular stomatitis is not completely understood but components include insect vectors, mechanical transmission, and livestock movement.


12 new cases of vesicular stomatitis confirmed in Bastrop County, Texas
By Miles Smith, Austin Community Newspaper Staff
 

Twelve new cases of vesicular stomatitis have been confirmed in both horses and cows in Bastrop County, the Texas Animal Health Commission confirmed Wednesday.

The properties are all within an eight-mile radius of Bastrop, according to the report.

VS can cause blisters and sores in the mouth and on the tongue, muzzle, teats or hooves of horses, cattle, swine, sheep, goats, llamas and a number of other animals. Lesions usually will heal in two or three weeks.

Because of the contagious nature of VS and its resemblance to other diseases such as foot and mouth disease, animal health officials urge livestock owners and caretakers to report these symptoms to their veterinarian immediately.

The newly identified infected animals are currently under quarantine by the TAHC. Regulatory veterinarians will monitor affected and exposed livestock until all lesions have healed and a decision is made to release the quarantine (a minimum of 21 days).

"Livestock owners should try to limit exposure of their animals to biting flies. Sand flies and black flies play a role in the virus transmission, so controlling insects is important on all species of livestock," said Bastrop County Extension Agent Rachel Bauer. "Flies can be controlled using topical treatments, sprays, ear tags, pour-ons, rubs and feed through fly control products. Proper sanitation, manure management and removal of decomposing hay at feeding sites will also help decrease fly populations around feed rooms, barns and stalls.

"Fly populations thrive when adequate moisture and mild temperatures are present, which has been the weather pattern in the county, until recently."

VS is not highly contagious to people, but it can cause flu-like illness if infected saliva gets into an open wound, eyes or mouth.

"People handling potentially infected animals should wear gloves for protection, and talk with their physician if they have questions," Bauer said. "No human cases of VS have been reported at this time."

The Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) is urging landowners not to move animals or comingle them (rodeos, playdays, etc.), unless absolutely necessary.

"It is important for all livestock owners, large and small, to diligently monitor their livestock at this time, to prevent the further spread of this disease," said Bastrop County Judge Paul Pape. "Please watch for signs of VS in your livestock, and contact your local veterinarian if you suspect they have contracted it."